Dispatches From Armenia - Lost in Translation.

Updated: Jun 13


I realize this title is kind of a cop out. But there’s some truth to it. I was lucky enough to constantly be around an Armenian or Russian speaker during my first two weeks here and I could easily get by with my Armenian “hello” and “thank you.”


Now, when I’m out wandering the streets of Yerevan, I run into some problems. The other day I asked for coffee and then I inadvertently refused it. (Refusing rich, delicious Armenian coffee is a now crime in my book, too.) We had to have a third party intervention. Just days before that, I asked for lemonade but ended up with pear juice. Worse things can happen due to my language deficiencies, I know. And at least I’m trying. I think I’ve mastered how to ask for a bottle of water, (essential in this heat) and now I’m working on the forms of you, us, we, etc. Small steps.


I realize this title is kind of a cop out. But there’s some truth to it. I was lucky enough to constantly be around an Armenian or Russian speaker during my first two weeks here and I could easily get by with my Armenian “hello” and “thank you.”


Now, when I’m out wandering the streets of Yerevan, I run into some problems. The other day I asked for coffee and then I inadvertently refused it. (Refusing rich, delicious Armenian coffee is a now crime in my book, too.) We had to have a third party intervention. Just days before that, I asked for lemonade but ended up with pear juice. Worse things can happen due to my language deficiencies, I know. And at least I’m trying. I think I’ve mastered how to ask for a bottle of water, (essential in this heat) and now I’m working on the forms of you, us, we, etc. Small steps.

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This is really difficult. After two months in Armenia, my return to the U.S. looms. For the past week I’ve been trying more than ever to process this incredible experience with the hope of being able